All About Goldens: Retrive information on life with a Golden.

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Golden Retrievers rescued to-date!

Golden Rescue Resource Centre

Valuable tips on care and feeding. What behavioural challenges to expect. Common health concerns. Find it all and more here.


Before You Adopt

Is A Golden Retriever Right For You?

We think Goldens are just about perfect, but those unfamiliar with the breed should think twice before adopting one. Before committing to a decade or more of dog ownership, please think carefully about the following points.

Consider their size ~ this is a sturdy and muscular breed. According to the Canadian Kennel Club (CKC) breed standard, mature Golden Retriever males should measure 23"-24" at the highest point of the shoulder (the withers) and weigh about 75 lbs. Females are smaller 21.5"-22.5" at the withers and weigh about 65 lbs. Some Goldens entering the rescue program are substantially larger than this standard.

If you are an immaculate housekeeper, be aware that Golden Retrievers shed constantly (and especially in spring and fall). Grooming and regular household vacuuming are a must! Goldens retrieve. They will find all sorts of things to carry and present them to you when you least expect it. Expect to do some picking up after your dog. If you feel you need a guard dog, perhaps another breed might be a better choice. A Golden may or may not bark and growl when a stranger arrives; however, these dogs tend to be 'friendly marshmallows' and most make simply awful protective dogs. Goldens need to be exercised on a daily basis. If you hate the cold and rain and feel that a five minute stroll down the street is plenty of activity, you may wish to consider a less active breed.

All dogs are social animals and Goldens are perhaps a little more social than most. They need human companionship and attention! If you work outside the home all day and are gone most evenings and weekends, please consider carefully if it is fair to keep any dog at all. Responsible ownership of a Golden can be expensive. You may expect to pay $600 – $700 per year for food as well as about $200 for general sundries. Count on at least $200-$300 per year for basic preventative veterinary health care and remember that an injury or illness can be very costly. If you wish to have your dog professionally groomed or if you travel frequently, don't forget to add in groomer and kennel fees… and there's always the annual cost of licensing your dog with your city or town!


Frequently Asked Questions

COSTS:
The average cost to put a Golden through our program from initial intake to adoption is $1,750 as many require neutering, inoculations, microchipping, and other veterinary care required to get them healthy. Golden Rescue and our veterinary supporters cover all of these expenses. Our adoption fee for Goldens rescued within Ontario and Quebec is $500.  Our adoption fee for Goldens rescued from countries outside of Canada is $800.  These fees help us tremendously to defer the ever-increasing cost of care and transportation. 

AGE:
We have accepted Golden Retriever puppies as young as seven weeks old and rescued senior dogs which are 14. Most dogs coming into our program are mature adults one to five years-old. Males usually outnumber females.

WAITING LIST:
Although we frequently have a number of dogs in foster – be prepared to wait. We use a matching process to find our rescue Goldens their forever home, taking their specific needs into account when looking through applications. When a dog enters the program, we use information gathered from the previous owner or comments from shelter staff and veterinarians along with our impressions during the dog's observation period. Prospective adopters are then decided upon by criteria that best suit the dog's needs such as rural or urban location, size of yard, experience with dogs, number and ages of children, number and type of other pets, hours available for the dog, etc.

CHILDREN:
It is our policy not to adopt a rescued dog to families with young children under age eight.

HELP!:
Our board member in charge of behaviour and training is in touch with adopters regularly to ensure the settling-in period goes as smoothly as possible. Should an adopter require advice or help with our adopted Golden at any time, we are no further than a telephone call away.